Saturday, 25 April 2015

Selime Cathedral in Cappadocia in Turkey

26th April 2015
On the second day of my trip we visited Selime Cathedral - which is very impressive and for me a a wonder of nature.



The rock monastery of Selime situated 28 km from Aksaray, Selime is a town that was established at the end of the Ihlara ValleySelime Monastery is one of the largest religious buildings in Cappadocia, with a cathedral-size church. Inside the cathedral there are two rows of rock columns, these columns divide the cathedral into three sections. The size of the church is astonishing. The columns and arches of the church, cut directly from the tuff within the Selime monastery, still bear the tell-tale markings of various generations that once occupied it. Rudimentary icons from the early days can be seen more clearly, but detailed frescoes, painted later, are barely visible under the years of soot that covers the surfaces from when the Turks used the room for cooking, it also contains monks’ quarters, a large kitchen and even a stable for mules. The walls of the chambers were at one time adorned with frescoes but little of these remain. From the road there is a short but challenging climb up a steep and slippery hill to the monastery.
On the way up to the monastery, first you go through a tunnel-like corridor, which was part of the caravan path on which camels walked, the camel caravans came for a stopover as there was a large bazaar there, and for protection, camels were led to the central part of the monastery.
























Unfortunately it was cold and so windy. But the trip wonderful...

The friendly dog was a guard.


The top section has a fortress-like structure, the walls and trenches of which are still visible today. It also includes some secret passageways, a series of twisting, ever-steeper rock stairway-ladders. If you are adventurous enough, you can follow them, but the climb down can be a bit nerve-wracking but definitely worth the views. The monastery also has a courtyard, this was the section where important religious and military meetings were held.

 Cemetery Selime Sultan Turbesi which is located opposite the CaTHEDRAL
 It is amazing to see so old gravestones..
The symbolic tree which died as the people ....




Situated across the road from Selime monastery, surrounded by a cemetery, Selime Sultan Turbesi is another stop for visitors. It is a rare example of its type in Anatolia, as it is conical with an octagonal base. From the architectural style and materials used it most probably dates from the 13th century A.D.

19 comments:

  1. What an amazing place. The distant view gives a good perspective.

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    1. Andrew, you are right it is a perfect place for visit

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  2. Just awesome and must have been wonderful to see in person. So different from what we have here.
    You look comfortable sitting there all rugged up :)

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    1. Yes to be there personally it is an awesome experience

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  3. Wow that is something different.

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  4. Gosia, very interesting place to visit and it is fun to go in a group.

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    1. Nancy,it is a masterpiece of nature

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  5. What an interesting place with a fantastic history!
    Liz @ Shortbread & Ginger

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    1. Liz, it is a place I have not seen before in Europe

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  6. This would be at home in Arizona or New Mexico. Very interesting. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. Tom it is Asia and it also rem,inds me about the US

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  7. Too bad about the weather, but what an incredible place!

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  8. Amazing, I need to go back to Turkey. My church, today, is an underground structure,

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  9. amazing cave and rock structures!

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  10. Very interesting, I'm always amazed at what people of old managed to build/create.

    Diana
    http://adifferentlenslens365.blogspot.co.nz/2015/04/a-seaside-chapel.html

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  11. Unusual though I would like to have seen more of the inside

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