Wednesday, 11 November 2015

Magpies I love and admire them - they are simple charming birds

11th November 2015


A lot of magpies live at my place. I admire them walking dog. Today it is Independence Day so I have much moere time to take them some photos while are eating,


They are lovely birds. And always in fashion - white and black is elegant suit!!


Here the great company crow and magpie..


Here and intersting facts from Wiki

Traditions and symbolism

Europe

In Europe, magpies have been historically demonized by humans, mainly as a result of superstition and myth. The bird has found itself in this situation mainly by association, says Steve Roud: "Large blackbirds, like crows and ravens, are viewed as evil in British folklore and white birds are viewed as good," he says.] In European folklore the magpie is associated with a number of superstitions] surrounding its reputation as an omen of ill fortune. In the 19th century book, A Guide to the Scientific Knowledge of Things Familiar, a proverb concerning magpies is recited: "A single magpie in spring, foul weather will bring". The book further explains that this superstition arises from the habits of pairs of magpies to forage together only when the weather is fine. In Scotland, a magpie near the window of the house is said to foretell death.
In Britain and Ireland a widespread traditional rhyme, One for Sorrow, records the myth (it is not clear whether it has been seriously believed) that seeing magpies predicts the future, depending on how many are seen. There are many regional variations on the rhyme, which means that it is impossible to give a definitive version.

In both Italian and French folklore, magpies are believed to have a penchant for picking up shiny items, particularly precious stones. Rossini'sopera La gazza ladra and The Adventures of Tintin comic The Castafiore Emerald are based on this theme. In BulgarianCzechGerman,HungarianPolishRussianSlovak and Swedish folklore the magpie is also seen as a thief. In Sweden it is further associated with witchcraft. In Norway, a magpie is considered cunning and thievish too, but also the bird of huldra, the underground people.

18 comments:

  1. Gosia

    Your magpies look far smaller than the magpies here in Australia.
    The "myths" of these European magpies are a bit strange.
    Here magpies and crows are far from "bon amies" - they do not get on
    together one iota.
    Magpies here will attack crows and I cheer the magpies on. I detest
    bloody crows and how they pluck eyes out of new born lambs etc.
    Magpies here have such lovely musical calls and can be trained to talk.!!!
    But their nesting areas are certainly to be avoided at nesting time. They
    are pretty good at "dive bombing - Stukka style". I have had my ears picked
    and cap removed on quite a few occasions.
    Besides these annoying foibles they are lovely birds with melodious calls.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Colin I think it is a bit different species than yours.

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  2. Thanks so much for the info today on the Magpies. Interesting how they have taken on such a reputation, for sure. And such a lovely bird in black and white. Thanks for joining in today, Gosia!

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    1. Linda magpies have a bad reputation here as thieves

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  3. I have always thought they looked so striking in their black & white tuxedos!!

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  4. You know my late mum used to know that poem about the crows...your magpie and crow look a little different from ours.

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    1. Yes Margaret - those Polish magpies are much smaller than our version.
      I am glad you verified my eye-sight - ha ha.
      We do have a bird here - black and white which is an "in-between" the size of a magpie and a "pee-wee", but I can't think of the bloody name, which is about the same size as that bird shown.
      Colin

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    2. So one day you sdhould upload the poem it would be nice

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  5. Black and white is a beautiful mixture. Stands out and attractive too!

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  6. A neat bird! Too bad there are so many superstitions about it. I've heard about magpies, but I don't think I've ever seen one in person.

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  7. Have not seen it yet til your post! Magpies are attractive!

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    1. So nowadays you are better educated about Europe

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  8. Hello!:) You are right about all that superstitious nonsense (or is it!) If I see a one Magpie, I hope to see another, because two are for joy. It's a beautiful bird however, and it does not deserve to be feared. Have a good Sunday!:)

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