Thursday, 21 May 2015

Bru Art in Turkey

22 nd April 2015

Bru Art is an amazing skill and I tried to do it personally it is not easy but fascinating activity,

Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design, which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on either plain water or a viscous solution known as size, and then carefully transferred to an absorbent surface, such as paper or fabric. Through several centuries, people have applied marbled materials to a variety of surfaces. It is often employed as a writing surface for calligraphy, and especially book covers and endpapers in bookbinding and stationery. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype.



There are several methods for making marbled papers. A shallow tray is filled with water, and various kinds of ink or paint colors are carefully applied to the surface with an ink brush. Various additives or surfactant chemicals are used to help float the colors. A drop of "negative" color made of plain water with the addition of surfactant is used to drive the drop of color into a ring. The process is repeated until the surface of the water is covered with concentric rings.
The floating colors are then carefully manipulated either by blowing on them directly or through a straw, fanning the colors, or carefully using a human hair to stir the colors. In the 19th century, the Kyoto master Tokutaro Yagi developed a method for using a split piece ofbamboo to gently stir the colors, resulting in concentric spiral designs. Finally, a sheet of washi paper is carefully laid onto the water surface to capture the floating design. The paper, which is often made of kozo (Paper Mulberry or Broussonetia papyrifera), must beunsized, and strong enough to withstand being immersed in water without tearing.
Another method of marbling more familiar to Europeans and Americans is made on the surface of a viscous mucilage, known as size orsizing in English. This method is commonly referred to as "Turkish" marbling, although ethnic Turkic peoples were not the only practitioners of the art, as Persian Tajiks and people of Indian origin also made these papers. The term "Turkish" was most likely used as a reference to the fact that many Europeans first encountered the art in Istanbul.



Exhibition in gallery. They are so original but very expensive..


I tried to do it .. Look at it..

16 comments:

  1. really neat patterns created!

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  2. Well, at least you tried, Gosia....I wouldn't even attempt it!

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    1. I am not talented person but I have tried

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  3. Interesting technique to learn about. I quite like your attempt.

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  4. Interesting! You almost did it, but you have created your own unique design on your first attempt!

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  5. You did well....I suppose an art done with practice to perfect.

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    1. I have it at my home looks nice

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  6. Replies
    1. Pat it is difficult but there are special courses how to do it

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  7. I think your attempt is quite nice, Gosia. It looks like it would be fun to do.

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    1. Cynthia thanks it is a nice work but not clean one

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  8. I think it looks pretty darn wonderful too, Gosia.

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